A new job and a dead GPU: An excuse for a new gaming PC

Something quite notable in my life has happened that I forgot to mention in my last post. After seven years in third-level education and just as much time spent in my previous job as a shop assistant in a petrol station, I’ve finally got a job that is relevant to what I’m studying and am most proficient at. I’m now working in enterprise technical support for Dell, which is quite a change, but both makes use of my technical skills learned both at DIT and the almost twenty years that I’ve spent playing around with computers in my own time and the customer service skills that I learned in my last job. Notably, the new job comes with a considerable increase in my pay; while the two-and-a-half times increase per annum comes mostly because of the fact that I work five days a week now, I am still making more now than I would have working full time previously.

Coincidentally, very recently, I experienced some bizarre glitches on my primary desktop computer, where the X Window System server on Linux appeared to freeze every so often, necessitating a reboot. Resolving the cause of the problem took some time, from using SSH to look at the Xorg logs when the crash occurred to discovering that the issue later manifested itself occasionally as graphical glitches rather than a complete freeze of the X Window System, then later experiencing severe artifacting in games on both Linux and Windows. In the end, the diagnosis led to one conclusion – my five-year-old ATI Radeon HD 4890 graphics card was dead on its feet.

Fortunately, I had retained the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTS that the computer had originally been built with, so I was able to keep my primary desktop going for everyday tasks by swapping the old GPU in for the newer, dead one. However, considering the seven years that I’ve got out of this computer so far, I had already been considering building a new gaming desktop during the summer to upgrade from a dated dual-core AMD Athlon 64 X2 to something considerably more modern. The death of my GPU, while not ultimately a critical situation – after all, I did have a replacement, a further three computers that I could reasonably fall back on and five other computers besides – did give me the impetus to speed up the process, though.

After looking into the price of cases, I decided that I would reuse an old full-tower case that currently holds my secondary x86 desktop (with a single-core AMD Athlon 64 and a GeForce 6600 GT), adapting it for the task by cutting holes to accommodate some 120mm case fans and spray-painting it black to cover up the discoloured beige on the front panel. Ultimately, this step will likely cost me almost as much as buying a new full-tower case from Cooler Master, but will at least allow me to keep my current desktop in reserve without having to worry where to find the space to put it. A lot of the cost comes from purchasing the fans, adapters to put 2.5” and 3.5” drives in 5.25” bays and selecting a card reader to replace the floppy drive that will be incompatible with my new motherboard. Nevertheless, the case is huge, has plenty of space for placing new components and should be much better for cooling than my current midi-tower case, even considering the jerry-rigged nature of it.

I had considered quite some time ago that I would go for a reasonably fast, overclock-friendly Core i5 processor and have found that the Core i5-4690K represents the best value for money in that respect – the extra features of the Core i7 are unnecessary for what I’ll be doing with the computer. To get the most out of the processor, I considered the Intel Z97 platform to be a necessity and was originally considering the Asus Z97-P before I realised that it had no support for multi-GPU processing. To be fair, I haven’t actually used either SLI or CrossFireX at any point, but do like the ability to use them later if I wish, so eventually, I settled on the much more expensive but more appropriate Asus Z97-A, which has capacity for both SLI and CrossFireX, the one PS/2 port I need to accommodate my Unicomp Classic keyboard without having to use up a USB slot and which seems to have sufficient room for overclocking of the i5-4690K.

To facilitate overclocking, I have also chosen to purchase 16GB of Kingston 1866MHz DDR3 RAM and an aftermarket Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo CPU cooler to replace the stock Intel cooler. I’m not looking for speed records here, but would like to have the capacity to moderately overclock the CPU to pull out the extra operations-per-second that might give me an edge in older, less GPU-intensive games. I’ve also gone for some Arctic Silver 5 cooling paste, since cooling has been a concern for me with previous builds and I’d like to make the most of the aftermarket cooler.

Obviously, being a gaming desktop, the GPU will be a big deal. I had originally looked at the AMD Radeon R9 280X as an option, but the retailer that I have purchased the majority of my parts from had run out of stock. As a consequence, I’ve gone a step further and bought a factory-overclocked Asus Radeon R9 290, hoping that the extra graphical oomph will be useful when it comes to playing games like Arma 3, where I experienced just about adequate performance with my HD 4890 at a diminished resolution. The Arma series has been key in making me upgrade my PCs before, so I’m not surprised that Arma 3 is just as hungry for GPU power as its predecessors.

I’ve also gone for a solid-state drive for the first time in order to speed up both my most resource-intensive games and the speed of Windows. I’ve purchased a Crucial MX100 128GB 2.5” SSD, which should be adequate for the most intensive games, while secondary storage will be accommodated by a 1TB Western Digital drive for NTFS and a 320GB Hitachi drive to accommodate everything to do with Linux. I also bought a separate 1TB Western Digital hard drive to replace the broken drive in my external hard drive enclosure, which experienced a head crash when I stupidly let it drop to the floor. Oops. Furthermore, I’ve also gone for a Blu-Ray writer for my optical drive – I’m not sure whether I’ll ever use the Blu-Ray writing capabilities, but for €15 more than the Blu-Ray reader, I decided to take the plunge. After all, I’m spending enough already.

Last but not least is the PSU. “Don’t skimp on the power supply”, I have told several of my friends through the years and this was no exception. Taking in mind the online tier lists for PSUs, I considered myself quite fortunate to find a Seasonic M12II 750W power supply available for under €100, with fully-modular design and enough capacity to easily keep going with the parts that I selected. The benefits for cable management from a modular power supply can’t be overstated, which will be useful even with the generous space in my case.

Overall, this bundle will cost me a whopping €1,500 – almost double what I spent on my current gaming desktop originally. Of course, any readers in the United States will scoff at this price, benefited by the likes of Newegg, but in Ireland, my choices are somewhat more limited, with Irish-based retailers being very expensive and continental European retailers not being as reliable when it comes to RMA procedures if something does go wrong. Nevertheless, I hope the new computer will be worth the money and provide the sort of performance gain that I haven’t had since I replaced my (again, seven-year-old) Pentium III system with the aforementioned single-core Athlon 64 system.

I’ll be looking forward to getting to grips once again with another PC build. Here’s hoping that the process will be a smooth one!

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